Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAl-Khatib, Issam A.en
dc.contributor.authorMonou, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorMosleh, Salem A.en
dc.contributor.authorAl-Subu, Mohammeden
dc.contributor.authorFatta-Kassinos, Despoen
dc.creatorAl-Khatib, Issam A.en
dc.creatorMonou, Mariaen
dc.creatorMosleh, Salem A.en
dc.creatorAl-Subu, Mohammeden
dc.creatorFatta-Kassinos, Despoen
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-18T06:18:35Z
dc.date.available2019-04-18T06:18:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://gnosis.library.ucy.ac.cy/handle/7/45192
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the dental waste management practices and safety measures implemented by dentists in the Nablus district, Palestine. A comprehensive survey was conducted for 97 of the 134 dental clinics to assess the current situation. Focus was placed on hazardous waste produced by clinics and the handling, storage, treatment and disposal measures taken. Mercury, found in dental amalgam, is one of the most problematic hazardous waste. The findings revealed that there is no proper separation of dental waste by classification as demanded by the World Health Organization. Furthermore, medical waste is often mixed with general waste during production, collection and disposal. The final disposal of waste ends up in open dumping sites sometimes close to communities where the waste is burned. Correct management and safety procedures that could be effectively implemented in developing countries were examined. It was concluded that cooperation between dental associations, government-related ministries and authorities needs to be established, to enhance dental waste management and provide training and capacity building programs for all professionals in the medical waste management field.en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the dental waste management practices and safety measures implemented by dentists in the Nablus district, Palestine. A comprehensive survey was conducted for 97 of the 134 dental clinics to assess the current situation. Focus was placed on hazardous waste produced by clinics and the handling, storage, treatment and disposal measures taken. Mercury, found in dental amalgam, is one of the most problematic hazardous waste. The findings revealed that there is no proper separation of dental waste by classification as demanded by the World Health Organization. Furthermore, medical waste is often mixed with general waste during production, collection and disposal. The final disposal of waste ends up in open dumping sites sometimes close to communities where the waste is burned. Correct management and safety procedures that could be effectively implemented in developing countries were examined. It was concluded that cooperation between dental associations, government-related ministries and authorities needs to be established, to enhance dental waste management and provide training and capacity building programs for all professionals in the medical waste management field.en
dc.sourceWaste Manag Resen
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0734242X09337657
dc.titleDental solid and hazardous waste management and safety practices in developing countries: Nablus district, Palestineen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0734242X09337657
dc.description.volume28
dc.description.issue5
dc.description.startingpage436
dc.description.endingpage444
dc.author.facultyΠολυτεχνική Σχολή / Faculty of Engineering
dc.author.departmentΤμήμα Πολιτικών Μηχανικών και Μηχανικών Περιβάλλοντος / Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
dc.type.uhtypeArticleen
dc.contributor.orcidFatta-Kassinos, Despo [0000-0003-1173-0941]


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record